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Glenstone wins AIA Architecture Award

PWP's collaboration with Thomas Phifer and Partners, Glenstone Museum, won a 2020 AIA Architecture Award. The jury commented, "The Glenstone Museum is a virtuoso display of design and detail, and a poetic integration of art, architecture and landscape."

"This major expansion of the Glenstone Museum in Potomac, MD, dramatically increases exhibition space for its collection of post-World War II art from around the world. The centerpiece, a 204,000-square-foot building called the Pavilions, is ringed by a dramatically renovated landscape boasting 6,000 new trees and 55 native species, helps advance the museum’s mission of presenting contemporary art in a captivating setting.

Overall, the project increased the museum’s exhibitions space by 50,000 square feet and more than doubled the area of restored woodlands, meadows, and streams. The landscape design was driven by a strategic master plan that increased the accessible land by more than 130 acres and provided a new public entrance, two free-standing cafes, and a center that highlights the sustainable practices deployed at the museum."

To read more about this award, click here. To read more about Glenstone, click here

Glenstone wins AIA NY Best in Competition Design Award

Glenstone wins AIA NY Best in Competition Design Award. 

 

PWP and Thomas Phifer and Partners won the Best in Competition Award from AIA NY. "Visitors leave their cars in parking groves and are greeted at the Arrival Hall, where they are introduced to Glenstone and oriented for their visit. Their short walk to the museum on accessible paths proceeds over a timber bridge and into an expansive meadow, where one of the outdoor sculptures is visible in the distance. As the path curves, visitors glimpse the new building through a wooded verge of honey locusts, oaks and tulip trees, until they emerge with a full view of the museum entrance. From the entrance, visitors take steps or an elevator down to the lower level where the galleries surround an open water court richly planted with water lilies, irises and rushes, creating a dynamic landscape that changes throughout the seasons Natural lighting is fundamental to the design of the museum. Most rooms have large clerestories or laylights that provide balanced natural light from above. One outdoor sculpture gallery is open to the sky. The play of light and shadow varies throughout the day; and as the seasons change, the light fluctuates, revealing subtle qualities in the artworks providing a more natural, nuanced experience. The new landscape design integrates walking paths, bridges and restored meadows and woodlands. More than 6,000 trees of 55 native species have been planted across the grounds, bringing the total installed at Glenstone to 8,000. Approximately 33 acres of existing pastureland have been developed into sustainable meadows with a range of indigenous flora."

 

For more information about Glenstone, click here

Finding the flower bed in the firmament

Perhaps it is those shared garden-art perceptions that make me think of the Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Md., as a place where the sky plays such an important role. You cannot view Jeff Koons’s quirky “Split-Rocker,” either from afar in silhouette or close up against its (in-season) fabric of flowers, without seeing its place against the sky. The sculpture is almost 40 feet high and sits on Glenstone’s highest point. The positive of the monumental sculpture is only given its form and scale and presence in the landscape against the negative of the sky.

Most Popular DIRT Posts of 2019

Readers were most interested in how to plan and design universally-accessible landscapes; how communities are increasingly looking towards landscape architecture as a solution for the climate crisis; examples of inventive multi-use, multi-purpose infrastructure, like the Jewel Changi airport terminal in Singapore and Amager Bakke in Copenhagen; and the on-going debate about the changing roles of landscape architects and urban planners.

Rebirth of Ground Zero named one of Architectural Digest's most important design moments of the last 10 years

"In the wake of 9/11, New Yorkers and the world wondered what was to become of hte distressed downtown Manhattan site. Ground Zero sat patiently as a recovery and construction zone for years, slowly transforming into a fitting memorial." 

 

For more information about the September 11 Memorial, click here

Finding San Francisco's famous fog 8,500 miles away

"Visitors to the Jewel at Singapore's Changi Airport have a lot to take in when setting foot inside the gleaming donut-shaped building. It's part shopping center, part indoor garden, and part theme park. And according to most surveys, it's the world's best airport. At the core of it all is the towering rain vortex- the largest indoor waterfall in the world. The numerous photos and video you've likely seen online don't do it justice. One needs to pay an in-person visit to absorb the magnitude of it all. But if you look in the right places, visitors from the Bay Area will find something very familiar and unexpected: fog. Yes, that's right. 8,500 miles away, in steaming Singapore, you'll find passengers delighting in the cool, wet fog that we take for granted in the Bay Area."

2019's Biggest Developments in Landscape Architecture

"This year showcased how landscape architecture is shaping public life in the built environment. In the first two decades of the 21st century, landscape architects created vibrant resiliency plans, rehabilitation projects, and new urban parks. As these twenty years come to a close, 2019 embodied many larger ideas and trends that will continue to influence the next decade of landscape design.


Exploring the most notable developments with Charles A. Birnbaum, President + CEO of The Cultural Landscape Foundation, this year included many memorable moments both large and small. Increasingly, works of landscape architecture are widely recognized as vital public amenities and essential elements in economic revitalization and placemaking. As the CLF states, perhaps the greatest challenge to the shared legacy of cultural landscapes comes from climate change."

 

To read more about Salesforce Transit Center, click here

The Floating Utopia of Salesforce Park

"Salesforce Park, in downtown San Francisco, sits atop the Salesforce Transit Center, above Salesforce Plaza, in the shadow of Salesforce Tower. It is a lush, five-and-a-half-acre rooftop arcadia of rolling meadows and meticulously landscaped, climatically harmonious, drought-tolerant flora. It contains a prehistoric garden of cycads, ferns, and Wollemi pines; plots dedicated to the plants of Chile, South Africa, and Australia; and a small wetland hydrated with gray water. It is a linear park—longer than it is wide—and is elevated about seventy feet above the sidewalk. Its lush, verdant lawns, deliberately overgrown, are two googly eyes short of a Jim Henson character."

My 27-Hour Vacation in Singapore's Changi Airport

"Before you recoil at the thought of an airport holiday, let me explain. This is no ordinary airport. It's Singapore's Changi: part theme park, part futuristic pleasure dome. And while an airport is typically a limbo- a swinging door between where you've been and where you're going- Changi is the rare airport that invites you to stay." 

Adam Greenspan interview on DESIGN:ED Podcast

"What I think you can see is that the work that we show is the work that we’ve done. It’s really important that we work on design and landscape architecture that is realizable in the real world, gets built, and is able to have a life of its own as part of a community, as part of a system." 


"Seeing places take on a life of their own is the proudest moment, being able to go somewhere when its not, you know, my work or our work, but it’s a place that people are really excited by or enlightened by or moved by…and seeing people, or animals, or plants end up spending time at the projects that we’ve designed and those projects becoming their home, their place is something that is really touching it makes you think about the future, and time and how what we do today, hopefully will last hundreds of years into the future."

Listen here

Peter Walker's Interview for Hideo Sasaki 100th Birthday Celebration

Peter Walker interviewed by James Miner of Sasaki on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Hideo Sasaki's birth. To see the interview, click here