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Singapore's New Garden Airport

International airports are in fierce competition for passengers and regularly one-up each other with new wow-factor amenities, shops, and restaurants. But Singapore decided to raise its game by going another direction: a plant-filled haven, a gateway consistent with its moniker — “the city in a garden.” The result is an inventive model other airports should copy, if not in form, then certainly in spirit.


The new Jewel Changi airport features a 6-acre indoor forest, walking trails, and the world’s tallest indoor waterfall. This restorative mecca filled with 2,500 trees and 100,000 shrubs not only revitalizes weary international travelers but is also open to the public.


Over the past six years, Safdie Architects has led a team that included PWP Landscape Architecture, Atelier 10, WET, Burohappold, and ICN International to create this bar-raising travel experience.

World's tallest indoor waterfall inside Moshe Safdie's Singapore airport terminal

"Moshe Safdie's 40-metre-tall Rain Vortex- the world's tallest indoor waterfall- is the centerpiece of Singapore's soon-to-open Jewel Changi Airport.

The waterfall pours down seven storeys from an oculus in the glass domed roof of the Safdie Architects-designed airport, which is scheduled to open on 17 April.


Engineer Buro Happold designed the glass and steel bagel-shaped roof, which spans more than 200 metres at its widest point, while Peter Walker and Partners Landscape Architects created the climate-controlled indoor forest."

What Ever Happened to the "Original Green Building"?

Singular upon completion in 1971, the “original green building” was designed by SOM as a new home for the Weyerhaeuser forestry company. The “groundscraper” serves as the centerpiece of a bucolic, 260-acre site planned by acclaimed landscape architect Peter Walker, then a partner at Sasaki, Walker and Associates. The campus includes a botanical garden, bonsai museum, and publicly accessible running and hiking trails — uncommon features for a nominally private office park.

Singapore's New "Jewel" Will Make the World's Best Airport Even Better

"If you like your greenery with a side of air conditioning, you're in luck. Jewel's "Forest Valley," developed in partnership with PWP Landscape Architecture, includes a five-story garden with walking trails, approximately 2,500 trees, and 100,000 shrubs sourced from countries like Brazil, Australia, China, Malaysia, Thailand, the U.S., and more. But it's not just one big garden—instead, it comprises, four "gateway" gardens, each with unique landscape elements that you can linger in, whether or not you're flying out of Changi."

World Trade Center site to get memorial honoring those affected by 9/11-realated illnesses

"the 9/11 Memorial and Museum plans to open a section dedicated to those who’ve died or have grappled with 9/11-related illnesses—first responders, survivors, and New Yorkers who lived close to the World Trade Center site during the recovery efforts among them.


Architects Michael Arad and Peter Walker, who designed “Reflecting Absence,” the twin pools of the memorial, also planned the new addition."

Safdie Architects Reveals Design for Surbana Jurong Headquarters in Singapore

"the series of ‘treehouse-like’ pavilions which comprises the headquarters are united by a centralized pedestrian walkway, weaving throughout interior and exterior landscapes. this path designates a spatial hierarchy, generating a network of offices embedded within the surrounding parkland. a glazed pedestrian spine and a series of both open-air and enclosed courtyards provide natural light and fresh air. a diverse array of plant life for each courtyard will be curated by PWP landscape architects, introducing to each its own distinctive character. the north courtyard, with a shared meeting center, is quieter in nature and lushly planted to create intimate spaces within the gardens. the south courtyard, with a cafeteria program, is much livelier and is primarily a hardscaped piazza punctuated by more formal planting."

Glenstone, a Maryland museum that blends modern art, nature and contemplation

Washington, D.C., is jam-packed with museums, but the must-see art collection in the region right now is 20 miles from the Mall, in Potomac, Maryland: Glenstone, where ultra-modern galleries and giant sculptures by the likes of Jeff Koons and Richard Serra play peekaboo with their surroundings.
Mitch and Emily Rales built Glenstone on a 230-acre site to share their extraordinary collection of modern and contemporary art. But they wanted to make this a different kind of museum – a blend of art, architecture and nature. "The landscape is meant to loosen you up and let your mind start to wander," said Mitch.

BRDI Presents: Michael Dellis on Art and Landscape

PWP's Michael Dellis will be lecturing at The Nevada Museum of Art on December 13, 2018 at 6PM. Tickets can be found here

Glenstone's landscaping as mindful as its artwork

"But the most potent if understated factor in this bid for active tranquility is in Glenstone’s landscape design, which marries its old topography to the new, while more than doubling the amount of outdoor space to 230 acres."

Learn more at The Washington Post

Related Links: An Oasis of Art (The Washington Post), Going to Glenstone? (The Washington Post), More Than a Museum: Why Potomac's Expanded Glenstone is Worth the Trip (Washingtonian) 

Glenstone, a Private Art Xanadu, Invests $200 Million in a Public Vision

"The Glenstone addition has a strong outdoor component, with 130 acres of meadows, woodlands and streams, designed by Adam Greenspan and Peter Walker of PWP Landscape Architecture. Among the sculptures integrated into the landscape are those by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Ellsworth Kelly and Richard Serra. The couple employ a full-time horticulturist to tend to the 24,000 flowers in Jeff Koons’s monumental “Split-Rocker.”
The expansion includes an environmental center, offering educational programs, that will open in the spring. “We’re tree-huggers,” Mr. Rales said."

Continue reading at The New York Times.