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Second Wave of Modernism IV: Making Space within Place Conference

Although Dallas, Texas, is the ninth largest city in the United States, the number of residents in the Dallas-Fort Worth area increased more than in any other metropolitan area in the nation from 2017 to 2018, according to recent estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. To explore the choices that will shape Dallas’ future, and to initiate and inspire broad community-based participation in decision-making, The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) will curate a one-day conference on Friday, October 4, 2019, in the Horchow Auditorium of the Dallas Museum of Art. Second Wave of Modernism IV: Making Space within Place will highlight the city’s leadership with projects that balance design with natural and cultural values and the imperative to deal with climate change. It will also showcase the city’s public-private initiatives and recent innovations in creative management and stewardship.
 
Introductory presentations (by Peter Walker, Peter Ker Walker, and James Burnett) will illuminate the role that landscape architects have played in laying the foundation for today’s planning and design work by exploring several iconic projects completed in the Dallas Arts District over the past 35 years. A morning panel, titled “Transforming the Downtown Core,” will examine four projects (by Field Operations, Hargreaves Associates, Ten Eyck Landscape Architects and SWA) that are currently in the design or construction phase in downtown Dallas, revealing how a public-private partnership was able to facilitate the development of these priority parks in the urban core. The afternoon panel, “Transforming and Connecting the City,” will be a forward-looking discussion of larger-scale projects currently underway (i.e., in the planning, design, or execution phase) that aim to balance, leverage, and steward both natural and cultural resources. The closing panel, featuring leaders in landscape architecture, planning, journalism, patronage, and stewardship, will reflect on the day’s presentations. 
 
Making Space within Place is the fourth installment in an ongoing series of conferences about the Second Wave of Modernism. Earlier conferences on that theme were held at the University of Toronto (2015), New York’s Museum of Modern Art (2011), and the Chicago Architecture Foundation (2008).

SF's Transbay transit center rooftop park reopens to the public- quietly

Left to itself and to gardeners, the rooftop landscape designed by PWP Landscape Architecture has flourished. Lavender beds are fragrant, and clusters of birds of paradise spike up as colorful flocks. Maple trees are thick with delicate leaves. Ivy is beinginning to shroud the concrete walls that hold elevators and a restaurant to-be. 

 

To keep reading, visit San Francisco Chronicle

Moshe Safdie Designs Sigapore's Jewel Changi Airport As a Destination Garden

"...to create Jewel is to conceive of a design in which architecture and landscape are totally integrated. Landscape is not an add-on feature, or an optional embellishment, but rather a fundamental component of space. Its deployment creates the opportunity for a new kind of spatial experience, one that specifically echoes and celebrates Singapore’s reputation as the Garden City—but, at its heart, is a humanistic response that is not bound to a particular locale." 

Safdie Architects Designs a 130-Foot-High Indoor Waterfall for Singapore's Jewel Changi Airport

"Occupying over a tenth of Jewel’s total area, the gardens, designed by Berkeley, California–based PWP Landscape Architecture, are ever present when one enters the structure, which opened on April 17. Along the marketplace that loops around Jewel’s periphery, various “canyons” open up to the gardens and the constant stream of the waterfall invites visitors to weave in and out of them. Several shops also feature terraces that look out on the gardens, which consist of approximately 2,500 trees and 100,000 shrubs sourced from Australia, Brazil, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the United States. According to Adam Greenspan of PWP, these mostly highland species will thrive in Jewel’s controlled environment, which is similar to subtropical climates that are less hot and humid than that of Singapore."

Singapore's New Garden Airport

International airports are in fierce competition for passengers and regularly one-up each other with new wow-factor amenities, shops, and restaurants. But Singapore decided to raise its game by going another direction: a plant-filled haven, a gateway consistent with its moniker — “the city in a garden.” The result is an inventive model other airports should copy, if not in form, then certainly in spirit.


The new Jewel Changi airport features a 6-acre indoor forest, walking trails, and the world’s tallest indoor waterfall. This restorative mecca filled with 2,500 trees and 100,000 shrubs not only revitalizes weary international travelers but is also open to the public.


Over the past six years, Safdie Architects has led a team that included PWP Landscape Architecture, Atelier 10, WET, Burohappold, and ICN International to create this bar-raising travel experience.

World's tallest indoor waterfall inside Moshe Safdie's Singapore airport terminal

"Moshe Safdie's 40-metre-tall Rain Vortex- the world's tallest indoor waterfall- is the centerpiece of Singapore's soon-to-open Jewel Changi Airport.

The waterfall pours down seven storeys from an oculus in the glass domed roof of the Safdie Architects-designed airport, which is scheduled to open on 17 April.


Engineer Buro Happold designed the glass and steel bagel-shaped roof, which spans more than 200 metres at its widest point, while Peter Walker and Partners Landscape Architects created the climate-controlled indoor forest."

What Ever Happened to the "Original Green Building"?

Singular upon completion in 1971, the “original green building” was designed by SOM as a new home for the Weyerhaeuser forestry company. The “groundscraper” serves as the centerpiece of a bucolic, 260-acre site planned by acclaimed landscape architect Peter Walker, then a partner at Sasaki, Walker and Associates. The campus includes a botanical garden, bonsai museum, and publicly accessible running and hiking trails — uncommon features for a nominally private office park.

Singapore's New "Jewel" Will Make the World's Best Airport Even Better

"If you like your greenery with a side of air conditioning, you're in luck. Jewel's "Forest Valley," developed in partnership with PWP Landscape Architecture, includes a five-story garden with walking trails, approximately 2,500 trees, and 100,000 shrubs sourced from countries like Brazil, Australia, China, Malaysia, Thailand, the U.S., and more. But it's not just one big garden—instead, it comprises, four "gateway" gardens, each with unique landscape elements that you can linger in, whether or not you're flying out of Changi."

World Trade Center site to get memorial honoring those affected by 9/11-realated illnesses

"the 9/11 Memorial and Museum plans to open a section dedicated to those who’ve died or have grappled with 9/11-related illnesses—first responders, survivors, and New Yorkers who lived close to the World Trade Center site during the recovery efforts among them.


Architects Michael Arad and Peter Walker, who designed “Reflecting Absence,” the twin pools of the memorial, also planned the new addition."

Safdie Architects Reveals Design for Surbana Jurong Headquarters in Singapore

"the series of ‘treehouse-like’ pavilions which comprises the headquarters are united by a centralized pedestrian walkway, weaving throughout interior and exterior landscapes. this path designates a spatial hierarchy, generating a network of offices embedded within the surrounding parkland. a glazed pedestrian spine and a series of both open-air and enclosed courtyards provide natural light and fresh air. a diverse array of plant life for each courtyard will be curated by PWP landscape architects, introducing to each its own distinctive character. the north courtyard, with a shared meeting center, is quieter in nature and lushly planted to create intimate spaces within the gardens. the south courtyard, with a cafeteria program, is much livelier and is primarily a hardscaped piazza punctuated by more formal planting."